28.9.19

books I read summer + 09/19

Time to catch us all up on some recent and not so recent reads. As suspected, summer turned out to be a time of fewer books completed as generally I have almost no alone time (all three are home all summer and they don't do day camps or the like so I'm with them all day every day). As much as I love reading, I love summer with my kids way more, so don't feel sorry for me :)
I'm also starting to include Amazon affiliate links to these posts, so click on the links  if you'd like to buy any of them and you'll be directed to Amazon's page. I've gone back to link all of the books I've previously posted in this serious, so you can find those books here.  It will make for one easy stop for you to find the titles I've mentioned in various blog posts, but also give me a small (very small) percentage of Amazon's sales. If you buy anything from my Amazon links (books or otherwise), you'll pay the same as you would on Amazon, but Amazon gives me a small cut of their profits for curating the items for you guys. I've gone back and linked previous Books I've Read Thanks for going this route and helping continue to support this blog! Here's my updates links for the books I read in MayAprilMarchFebruary, and January.

I thought I'd make September and summer all in one post because I haven't finished too many. But smaller quantity is not a mark of smaller quality as this list includes one of my favourite (maybe my favourite!) modern fiction book OF ALL TIME. Read on!

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society - I read this in Greece and even though I'd seen the movie it was such a pleasure. A quick read but so full of charm. WWII themed books often draw me in but the quaint book club on the British isle of Guernsey and every character therein were why I loved it. Lovely characters and story.

Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom - Oh this biography! It was so powerful and beautiful. What a life Corrie ten Boom had and how she lived was such an inspiration! Christian biographies are some of my favourite means to learn about God and inspire my faith. I find biographies are like theology with skin on, a living walking person pointing us to Jesus. Corrie ten Boom's life is worth reading about and emulating. The book shows us her living testimony in Holland hiding Jews, in Germany at a concentration camp, and afterwards rehabilitating ex-servicemen from both sides of WWII with the grace of the gospel. A must read whether you're Christian or not!

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman - this is THE ONE guys! I'm not typically over the moon for modern fiction. Historical fiction is more my jam (if not classics) but I loved Eleanor Oliphant so much! First of all, the characters are gold. Unassuming and rich characters that are so normal and natural you feel like you might know them in real life. Also the heroine, Eleanor Oliphant is a delight! She's brave and honest and broken and I love cheering for her throughout the book. I want to own a paper copy, seeing as it's one of my favourite modern fiction pieces ever, but I do also recommend the audiobook because it was so perfectly narrated with all the various Scottish and English accents. I'm honestly so sad it's over!

The Common Rule by Justin Whitmel Earley - My friend Matt who has put a lot of thought and practice into the spiritual disciplines (and written about them here!) recommended this book to me and I knew based on his life which I admire and his fine book selections that it was a must read. I listened to it on Scribd over the course of two days and have begun putting some of the practices into my daily routine (no phone before scripture, fasting from something for 24 hours every month, limiting media to four hours per week, etc). Earley never makes the reader feel pressure or guilt, he simply invites you to a simpler, more free life with these disciplines. The gospel is woven throughout this book as well as personal tales of his life as a missionary in China and later a corporate lawyer.  


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